The Magic of Marenco Lodge

Our chalet at Veragua River House, Sierpe

We took a leisurely drive from San Vito down to the Pacific coast, arriving at Sierpe by mid-afternoon. We stayed one night at the old colonial style Veragua River House Bed & Breakfast, on the edge of town, before departing on the boat for Marenco Lodge the following day. We had two nights at this fabulously located lodge, including Jane’s 60th birthday, in cabanas over-looking the ocean and watching the sunset over Cano Island. The bird and animal life seen around the various trails was excellent.

In the grounds of our accommodation at Sierpe, this Mangrove Black Hawk

Other birds around the grounds included Cocoa Woodcreeper

 this diminutive Inca Dove

and Rufous-tailed Hummingbird

Along the river edge, Purple Gallinule

Just outside our chalet at Marenco Lodge, a resident pair of Chestnut-mandibled Toucan

In the dense forests surrounding the lodge, lots of interesting stuff – this was the rather skulking Black-hooded Antshrike

Riverside Wren

Orange-billed Sparrow – seen at several previous locations, but not quite so well

Another one of the superb Trogons – this one is Black-throated

And the ‘star of the show’, the electric sparking, hopping and popping! – Orange-collared Manakin

Shorebirds were scarce but we did catch up with Magnificent Frigatebird

and Wandering Tattler

Marenco Lodge was a wonderful experience. The isolated location, with access to largely undisturbed rain-forest and coastline, was a memorable experience. The chalets were comfortable and the food reasonable. There is however an air of neglect about the place and the staff, whilst friendly, are too busy with their own stuff to be of much help to the self-guiding birder. Another expensive lodge which is trading on it’d former reputation, sadly in this instance, there is no ready alternative.

Our journey is drawing to an end now, last stop is Cerro Lodge, on the edge of the fabulous Carara National Park.

 

 

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This entry was posted in Birding.

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